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Evernote Use #28- Email Anything to Evernote #50EduEvernote

Posted by Jordan Collier on April 8, 2014 in Evernote |

The next time you find something you want to save, an easy way to do it is to email it to your Evernote account. This could be a website, a picture, an article, an actual email that you forward– really, anything you’d like to save.

Each Evernote account has a unique Evernote email address that allows you to email notes directly to Evernote. (Note: This is different than the email address used to create the account). The address follows this pattern:

username.#########@m.evernote.com

Your unique email address can be found by clicking on “Tools” and “Account Info” or by clicking “Settings –> General  –>  Evernote Email Address” on your mobile device.

 

3 Email Tips:

1. Save your Evernote email address as a contact in your address book.  You’ll thank me later!

2. Email to a specific notebook. Emailed notes will go to your default notebook. However, you can email directly to a specific Evernote notebook by adding @+notebook name in the subject line (i.e. @School Ideas or @Personal).

3. Add tags to emails by using # in the subject line (i.e #PD or #Receipts).

Example:  Suppose you register for a conference and receive an email confirmation. It would be a great idea to save that to Evernote for quick reference, so you’ll want to email your “Registration Confirmation” to your “Professional Development” notebook and add a “2013-2014 PD” tag to it. Your email subject line may look like this:

Registration Confirmation @Professional Development #2013-2014 PD

Email to Evernote

Email to Evernote

Mailed-in Evernote Note

Mailed-in Evernote Note

Have another Evernote Email tip to share? If so, leave it in the comment section.

 

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Using Social Media to Tell Our School’s Story

Posted by Jordan Collier on April 5, 2014 in Home |

In the book Digital Leadership, author Eric Sheninger says, ”If we don’t tell our story, someone else will, and more often than not, another’s version will not be the one we want told. Leaders need to become story-tellers-in-chief.”

For the past few months, I’ve been struck by the importance of telling our school’s story, so I’ve been listening to the BrandEd podcast, reading blog posts like this, diving into thought-provoking books like Digital Leadership, and even writing my own posts like this.

With that in mind, a few days before our annual fundraiser, I thought it would be cool to use Twitter and Facebook to ask our stakeholders (and that definitely includes our students) to share what they love about our school. The idea was to take a handful of responses and display them during our fundraiser event while attendees were making their way into the auditorium.

It was a great idea, but I’ll admit, I was somewhat hesitant. We were inviting anyone to share whatever they want about our school and even giving them a platform to do it!

What if someone posted something inappropriate?

Could we control what message was being shared?

What if this goes terribly wrong?

Despite our initial concerns, we went for it, tweeted out our question along with the hashtag, and we waited.

#cac2me

The responses were incredible— mainly from students, but also from parents, alumni, and friends of the school. Sure, there were some borderline inappropriate comments, but the majority of comments focused on all the ways our school has been a blessing for our students and the influence we’ve had in their lives.

Due to the overwhelming number of responses, our original idea of using PowerPoint to display the responses wasn’t going to work because it would have been too time-consuming to create. We looked at some other options (like Visible Tweets), but with a budget of $0, there was no way to use it and control what was displayed. Because I’ve already been using Storify to create our Mustang Mountain Tweets of the Week, I thought it might work. It actually turned out to be the perfect choice!

I created our story pulling and filtering responses from Twitter and Facebook, published the story, and then I added “/slideshow” to the end of the url to create this slideshow presentation to display during our event:

My school is a special place, and as a school leader, it’s my responsibility to tell our story. This little social media campaign worked for me– how have you been able to help tell your school’s story? I’d love to hear your ideas, so please share them below.

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Evernote Use #27- Say goodbye to your flash drive #50EduEvernote

Posted by Jordan Collier on March 25, 2014 in Evernote |

I have several Word and Excel files that I update regularly. I used to save the files in multiple locations– usually on my hard drive, on my school network drive, and undoubtedly on a flash drive. Because I would access one of the files from multiple locations, sometimes I wouldn’t update the most recently-changed document, so in essence, I had three or four versions of the same document floating around.

Using a flash drive helped me with this problem– as long as I didn’t lose my flash drive. But keeping up with a flash drive isn’t something I’m good at.

Maybe you can relate.

Today I don’t use flash drives, hard drives, or even my school’s network drive; now, I just use Evernote.

I save my Excel, PowerPoint, and Word files in a note, and when I need to update one of the documents, I open it the file, work on it, and when I save it, it saves it back to my Evernote note.

No more lost flash drives. No more having to drive to school at the night to search for something on my network drive. No more having a file saved on my laptop that I can’t access from school. It’s all on the cloud. Everything. Lesson plans, assignments, tests, projects, presentations, our budget– everything.

And not only that, but as a premium member, all of those files are searchable.

There are many great cloud-storage services out there. If you’re using one (even if it’s not Evernote), I’m sure you’re loving it. If you still save things on a flash drive or your hard drive, you may want to consider using Evernote.

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