If we don’t tell our story, someone else will.

Tell Our Story

Our school has a story that goes way beyond our history. We have a story with pages written every single day, and depending on who’s telling the story, the story could be a good one or could be one we don’t want shared. Despite the accuracies or inaccuracies in the details, a story of our school is told every day by our students, their parents, our employees, our alumni, and anyone else who’s ever even heard of us.

It’s imperative that we tell our story (and tell it often) if you we want the story to be accurate. It’s one reason posting often on Twitter and Facebook has been a focus of ours this year. We want to tell our story and share all of the great things that are happening at our school. This past week has been great and I’ve tried to share those great things on Twitter. At the end of each week, I’ve been using Storify to share the Mustang Mountain Tweets of the Week (see last week’s here).

But telling our story goes way beyond social media and our web page. We are the greatest ambassadors of our school and in many of our interactions outside of school we tell a little of the our story. Here are four things to keep in mind to help us tell a great story.

1. Always be positive. Everything isn’t perfect at our school, but that doesn’t mean we should broadcast the negative stuff! It’s important for us watch our words, being certain that what we’re saying always paints our students, our faculty, our administration, and our school as a whole in a positive light. People are listening.

2. Share our students’ accomplishments. When students do great things, we need to brag on them. We have so many ways to share those successes- Twitter, our webpage, Facebook, etc. Be on the lookout for outstanding work and share it.

3. Look for awesome because you’ll find what you are looking for. (I probably just lost some of you because now you’re humming U2’s “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For.”) If you’re looking for things to complain about it, you’ll find plenty. However, if you look for the awesome things about our school, you’ll find plenty of those as well. Look for awesome.

4. When in doubt, over-communicate. Let parents know what’s going on at school. If students are working on projects in class, they may not have many grades posted online. Share that with parents so they will be in the loop and will tell a story of all the great things going in the classroom. If not, the story will be, “They don’t do much in class because there aren’t many grades.”

If you want some more insight into the importance of sharing your school’s story, check out Ben Gilpin’s latest blog post that he shared with his faculty. I promise he didn’t copy from me nor did I copy from him!
What’s the story you want people to tell about your school? Be sure that’s the story you’re telling often.