Evernote Use #22- Save Emergency Contact Forms #50EduEvernote

Any of us who travel with students must be prepared for emergencies so we often travel with valuable information.

  • Coaches carry an emergency contact form for each of our athletes.
  • Teachers carry field trips permission slips with emergency contact information for each student.
  • Bus drivers carry emergency information for each passenger.

Unfortunately, the forms are not always organized, sometimes they’re misplaced or forgotten, and often when there is an emergency, they are hard to find.

This past football season, a player from the visiting team was knocked unconscious. An ambulance was needed and the player was carted off the field. The visiting coach had left all of his players’ emergency contact information forms in his office and had no way of getting them before the ambulance arrived at the hospital.

Of all the times to forget the forms, this was the worst timing.

Our coaches and teachers won’t experience this. When students turn in their emergency contact forms, we scan them and save them as a PDF (using the Fujitsu ScanSnap). The forms are saved in a shared Evernote notebook and can be accessed when needed by our faculty.

It’s easy to forget to bring contact forms, but when they’re saved in Evernote, they can be accessed from anywhere.

Evernote Use #18- Curate and Share Information w/ a Shared Notebook #50EduEvernote

Over the next few weeks, I will be posting 50 different ways school administrators and educators can use Evernote to be more organized and more effective. I’ll be using #50EduEvernote on Twitter to further this discussion and share ideas. If you’d like, click here to follow me on Twitter.

Evernote Use #18- Curate and Share Information w/ a Shared Notebook

As an English teacher, I used a shared notebook to provide my students resources, study guides, homework assignments, helpful links, video tutorials, school handouts, and any other helpful information. I shared the notebook with my students and also made the notebook public and shared the URL with my students’ parents (click here to see a sample shared classroom notebook).

As an administrator, I created a shared notebook notebook to share resources, helpful links, video tutorials, school information, and any other helpful materials with our faculty. I invited each faculty member individually, but I did not create a public URL because some of the information shared needs to be kept in-house.

I also created a shared notebook for our administration team to use for discipline documentation, field trip requests, technology issues, insightful articles, and any other information that would benefit our administration team. I invited each of our administrators to join.

Creating a shared notebook is quick and easy to do.

Create and Share a Notebook

Create and Share a Notebook with Specific Individuals

The invitees will receive an email asking to join the notebook. Once they join, the notebook will be synced with their Evernote account, so anytime you add content to the notebook, they will see the updates.

If you’re looking for a great way to share information, consider using shared notebooks. You’ll just need to decide if you want to share the notebooks with individuals (meaning the invitee will need to have an Evernote account) or if you want to share the notebook with a public URL (anyone has access to the notebook and no Evernote account is required to view the notebook).

 

 

Evernote Use #13- Save PD Documetation #50EduEvernote

Over the next few weeks, I will be posting 50 different ways school administrators and educators can use Evernote to be more organized and more effective. I’ll be using #50EduEvernote on Twitter to further this discussion and share ideas. If you’d like, click here to follow me on Twitter.

Evernote Use #13- Keep Up With Professional Development Documentation

For years I kept a 3-ring binder for my professional development documentation. I would come back from a workshop, punch holes in my documentation, and put it in my binder. That is if I remembered to do it. Often I would forget and when I needed to turn in all of my hours, I’d have to track down all of those forms.

Now I use Evernote. (Of course I was going to say that, right?)

When I get any PD documentation, I scan or snap a picture of it and add the picture to my PD notebook in Evernote. I title the note the name of the conference and also tag it for quick reference.

Scanned PD Documentation (Evernote for Mac)

Scanned PD Documentation (Evernote for Mac)

In addition to saving PD workshop documentation in Evernote, I also save travel receipts. When I get a receipt, I immediately snap a picture of it (because more than likely I’ll lose it). I save all of my receipts from a trip in one note, and after the trip, I email the note to the accounting department for reimbursement.

Travel Expenses (Evernote for Mac)

Travel Expenses (Evernote for Mac)

At the end of the school year when it’s time to turn in all of my PD documentation, I have everything saved and can easily find it.

Since all educators must keep track of their PD, this a great way to encourage others to start using Evernote. Share this post with them and tell them they can get a free month of Evernote Premium just for creating an account!