How I’m Learning to be an Intentional Instructional Leader

My perception of classroom observations changed drastically when I read Rethinking Teacher Supervision and Evaluation by Kim Marshall. I then read Leverage Leadership by Paul Bambrick-Santoyo based on a recommendation from my friend Justin Baeder, director of the Principal Center.

I combined the key ideas I gathered from both books and developed an ambitious mini-observation & teacher meeting schedule that begins this week. Since I am the principal at a private school in Arkansas, we are not required to follow the state’s TESS guidelines. While I understand that many administrators reading this post are mandated to follow certain observation guidelines, perhaps by sharing my experiences and my processes, a few things may be applicable and beneficial.

In the traditional full observation system, classrooms are typically observed 2-4 times a year. When broken down by class periods (6 class periods x 178 days), that turns out to be 2 observations out of a possible 1,068 lessons (.002%). I will never believe that system provides an accurate picture of a classroom.Full Observations

 

Instead of relying on full observations, my emphasis this year will be on mini-observations which Marshall discusses in-depth in his book. A mini-observation is as follows:

  • 10-15 minute observation
  • unannounced
  • frequent (at least once every two weeks)
  • timely feedback provided

When broken down by class periods, that turns out to be around 18 observations out of 1,068 lessons (1.7%).

Mini-observationsMarshall recommends meeting with teachers informally within 24-48 hours of each observation. He suggests meeting in the hallways, in the copier rooms, at lunch, even in the parking lot– anywhere you can have a short conversation about the observation. After that, he suggests the administrator follow-up with an email documenting the observation and conversation.

While this system makes sense, I tried it last year and it was too tough for me. I would get distracted, and days would be go by before I had the opportunity to follow-up. Because I wasn’t timely with my feedback, the conversations rarely happened and I didn’t see the results I wanted.

So this year I’m going to try a different approach– one outlined in Leverage Leadership. I’m still sticking with mini-observations because I believe they provide a more accurate picture of a classroom. However, the follow-up conversations are scheduled in the form of 30-minute bi-weekly teacher meetings during each teacher’s planning period. Take a look below to see an example weekly schedule of my observations (in green) and meetings (in yellow).

Sample Weekly Schedule

Is it ambitious? Absolutely.

Am I crazy for trying this? Probably.

Is it doable? Yes, if I believe it works– and I do. Marshall convinced me when he wrote this:

Talking to teachers about the teaching and learning that’s going on in their classrooms is the heart and soul of instructional leadership. There’s nothing more productive and satisfying than being in classrooms and talking to colleagues about teaching and learning. This is the work!

(from Rethinking Teacher Supervision and Evaluation)

Today I was able to observe 7 classrooms and I had so much fun! I can’t remember a day last year that I was able to observe 7 classrooms.

Tomorrow we start our bi-weekly meetings. We’ll begin a process where we get to dedicate 30 minutes every other week to talk about student learning, to plan lessons together, to talk about classroom observations, and to help each other grow.

I’m so excited about this!

Today I began to feel like an instructional leader.

Tomorrow I’ll begin to be one.

Using Social Media to Tell Our School’s Story

In the book Digital Leadership, author Eric Sheninger says, “If we don’t tell our story, someone else will, and more often than not, another’s version will not be the one we want told. Leaders need to become story-tellers-in-chief.”

For the past few months, I’ve been struck by the importance of telling our school’s story, so I’ve been listening to the BrandEd podcast, reading blog posts like this, diving into thought-provoking books like Digital Leadership, and even writing my own posts like this.

With that in mind, a few days before our annual fundraiser, I thought it would be cool to use Twitter and Facebook to ask our stakeholders (and that definitely includes our students) to share what they love about our school. The idea was to take a handful of responses and display them during our fundraiser event while attendees were making their way into the auditorium.

It was a great idea, but I’ll admit, I was somewhat hesitant. We were inviting anyone to share whatever they want about our school and even giving them a platform to do it!

What if someone posted something inappropriate?

Could we control what message was being shared?

What if this goes terribly wrong?

Despite our initial concerns, we went for it, tweeted out our question along with the hashtag, and we waited.

#cac2me

The responses were incredible— mainly from students, but also from parents, alumni, and friends of the school. Sure, there were some borderline inappropriate comments, but the majority of comments focused on all the ways our school has been a blessing for our students and the influence we’ve had in their lives.

Due to the overwhelming number of responses, our original idea of using PowerPoint to display the responses wasn’t going to work because it would have been too time-consuming to create. We looked at some other options (like Visible Tweets), but with a budget of $0, there was no way to use it and control what was displayed. Because I’ve already been using Storify to create our Mustang Mountain Tweets of the Week, I thought it might work. It actually turned out to be the perfect choice!

I created our story pulling and filtering responses from Twitter and Facebook, published the story, and then I added “/slideshow” to the end of the url to create this slideshow presentation to display during our event:

My school is a special place, and as a school leader, it’s my responsibility to tell our story. This little social media campaign worked for me– how have you been able to help tell your school’s story? I’d love to hear your ideas, so please share them below.

Evernote Use #27- Say goodbye to your flash drive #50EduEvernote

I have several Word and Excel files that I update regularly. I used to save the files in multiple locations– usually on my hard drive, on my school network drive, and undoubtedly on a flash drive. Because I would access one of the files from multiple locations, sometimes I wouldn’t update the most recently-changed document, so in essence, I had three or four versions of the same document floating around.

Using a flash drive helped me with this problem– as long as I didn’t lose my flash drive. But keeping up with a flash drive isn’t something I’m good at.

Maybe you can relate.

Today I don’t use flash drives, hard drives, or even my school’s network drive; now, I just use Evernote.

I save my Excel, PowerPoint, and Word files in a note, and when I need to update one of the documents, I open it the file, work on it, and when I save it, it saves it back to my Evernote note.

No more lost flash drives. No more having to drive to school at the night to search for something on my network drive. No more having a file saved on my laptop that I can’t access from school. It’s all on the cloud. Everything. Lesson plans, assignments, tests, projects, presentations, our budget– everything.

And not only that, but as a premium member, all of those files are searchable.

There are many great cloud-storage services out there. If you’re using one (even if it’s not Evernote), I’m sure you’re loving it. If you still save things on a flash drive or your hard drive, you may want to consider using Evernote.