Evernote Use #23 – Digital Learning Portfolios #50EduEvernote

As both a parent and an educator, I place great value in documenting a child’s progress and growth. However, providing detailed information regarding growth isn’t as convenient as checking a box or assigning a grade. Documenting growth takes time– but it is certainly time well-spent.

Last year, my son was in PreK-3 and in December we received a progress report. It was my first “report card” experience as a parent– very surreal. I enjoyed reading over his progress report and it took every part of me to not want to “fix” all of his “deficiencies” (which we didn’t “fix”).

But let me ask you something:  Which of the following tells you more about my son’s progress with using scissors?

Option A- Progress Report Checklist

Progress Report

 Option B- Picture of Cut-Out

Picture of Square Cut-Out

Option C- Video of Student Cutting Out a Shape

Clearly, the video communicates progress more than the checklist and picture! How awesome would it be if teachers would combine video and audio along with a checklist to document their students’ progress in a digital portfolio that parents could access at any time?

Evernote is perfect digital portfolios. Click here to read how I used Evernote for digital writing portfolios in my 8th grade English class.

If you’d like to learn more about using Evernote for digital portfolios, here are some great resources:

Digital Portfolios Workshop (perfect for faculty training/professional development)

Evernote as Portfolio blog by Rob van Nood

The Power of E-Portfolios by Rob van Nood (ebook)

Principalcast Podcast interview with Matt Renwick

Reading by Example blog by Matt Renwick

Evernote Use #18- Curate and Share Information w/ a Shared Notebook #50EduEvernote

Over the next few weeks, I will be posting 50 different ways school administrators and educators can use Evernote to be more organized and more effective. I’ll be using #50EduEvernote on Twitter to further this discussion and share ideas. If you’d like, click here to follow me on Twitter.

Evernote Use #18- Curate and Share Information w/ a Shared Notebook

As an English teacher, I used a shared notebook to provide my students resources, study guides, homework assignments, helpful links, video tutorials, school handouts, and any other helpful information. I shared the notebook with my students and also made the notebook public and shared the URL with my students’ parents (click here to see a sample shared classroom notebook).

As an administrator, I created a shared notebook notebook to share resources, helpful links, video tutorials, school information, and any other helpful materials with our faculty. I invited each faculty member individually, but I did not create a public URL because some of the information shared needs to be kept in-house.

I also created a shared notebook for our administration team to use for discipline documentation, field trip requests, technology issues, insightful articles, and any other information that would benefit our administration team. I invited each of our administrators to join.

Creating a shared notebook is quick and easy to do.

Create and Share a Notebook

Create and Share a Notebook with Specific Individuals

The invitees will receive an email asking to join the notebook. Once they join, the notebook will be synced with their Evernote account, so anytime you add content to the notebook, they will see the updates.

If you’re looking for a great way to share information, consider using shared notebooks. You’ll just need to decide if you want to share the notebooks with individuals (meaning the invitee will need to have an Evernote account) or if you want to share the notebook with a public URL (anyone has access to the notebook and no Evernote account is required to view the notebook).

 

 

Evernote Use #7- Create a Classroom Homepage #50EduEvernote

Over the next few weeks, I will be posting 50 different ways school administrators and educators can use Evernote to be more organized and more effective. I’ll be using #50EduEvernote on Twitter to further this discussion and share ideas. If you’d like, click here to follow me on Twitter.

Evernote Use #7- Create a Classroom Homepage

Have you ever stood in front of a class and attempted to direct them to a specific website?

You may have projected or wrote a link on the board like this:

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=garber/090326

or maybe you displayed a shortened link like this:

http://shar.es/UtVQj  (which seems even harder to communicate!)

or maybe you created a QR code for the link like this:

QR Code

QR Code

or worse, you may have attempted to say it aloud:

“H-T-T-P-:-/-/-S-P-…”

If it’s a one-time thing, although it is frustrating, you can share a link all of the different ways listed above. However, having to do this on a regular basis in a classroom is both inefficient and ineffective.

No matter how you might try to direct an audience to a specific website, nothing is easier than just having them click on the link.

Here’s a solution:  Create a Classroom Homepage using an Evernote URL. For this you’ll need to share a URL link one time– after that, your students can just open the bookmarked link and click where you’d like for them to go.

Here’s how to do it:

Create a new Classroom Homepage Note in Evernote and copy the Share URL. Add any information, links, PDFs, pictures, documents, etc. to the note.

Evernote for Mac

Evernote for Mac

On the first day of school, share the homepage link with your students (you’ll probably have to use one of the sharing options mentioned earlier… sorry). Be sure your students bookmark the link you’ve shared. It’s also a good idea to have the link or QR code displayed in your classroom.

Here is what your Classroom Homepage may look like (student’s view):

Student's View

Student’s View

From that point forward, any time you need to share information or want your students or audience to visit a link, update the note in Evernote. Keep in mind, you can keep adding to your one single note throughout the entire year or replace the content each time you update it. That’s your call.

Evernote for Mac

Evernote for Mac

When students go to the homepage they’ve bookmarked, this is what they’ll see:

Student's View

Student’s View

Using Evernote as a classroom homepage is simple and easy to do. If you’ve always wanted your own classroom webpage, this may be the easiest way to do it.

 

 

50 Ways Admins and Teachers Can Use Evernote #50EduEvernote

#1- Checklists & To-Do Lists

#2- Taking and Organizing Meeting Notes

#3- Saving Handwritten Meeting Notes

#4- Emailing Files

#5- Capture Classroom and School Ideas

#6- Share Regularly-Update Documents