Evernote Use #20- Sending Emails to Your Future Self #50EduEvernote

Over the next few weeks, I will be posting 50 different ways school administrators and educators can use Evernote to be more organized and more effective. I’ll be using #50EduEvernote on Twitter to further this discussion and share ideas. If you’d like, click here to follow me on Twitter.

Evernote Use #20- Sending Emails to Your Future Self

Recently, Evernote added a very cool feature– reminders. For any note, click the alarm clock on the top of the note and schedule a time to be reminded of the note via email, notifications, or in the reminders section of your Evernote homepage.

Before Evernote reminders, I’ve used a cool site called FutureMe.org which is really simple:  you write an email to yourself in the future and select a date you want to receive it (like six months from now), and six months later you receive an email from yourself. Weird, I know– but really helpful. I’ve replaced using FutureMe with Evernote reminders.

Here is an actual email I sent to my future self last year when I was teaching 8th grade English (but for this example, I did change the dates):

Email I sent to future me for my English class

Email I sent to future me for my English class

In this example, I will receive an email reminder and Evernote notification on January 26, 2015 to encourage me when facing a mountain of essays to grade.

The next time you’re thinking next year, I’m going to… add that thought to Evernote and create a reminder for future you to read.

Evernote Use #17- Save and Share Your Reading Annotations #50EduEvernote

Over the next few weeks, I will be posting 50 different ways school administrators and educators can use Evernote to be more organized and more effective. I’ll be using #50EduEvernote on Twitter to further this discussion and share ideas. If you’d like, click here to follow me on Twitter.

Evernote Use #17- Save and Share Your Reading Annotations

As an active reader, I highlight, write notes, and copy key ideas every time I read– whether it is my own physical book, a borrowed book, or an ebook.

When I finish a book, I save my reading notes to Evernote so that I have them everywhere I go. I often find myself thinking back to something I’ve read, and I love being able to access those notes from anywhere.

I typically save my reading notes one of three ways:

1. Import my notes and highlights directly from my Kindle account. (To learn the process I use, click here.)

Kindle Highlights and Notes (transferred directly from Amazon)

Kindle Highlights and Notes (transferred directly from Amazon)

 

2. Scan my handwritten notes.

Handwritten Book Notes (scanned)

Handwritten Book Notes (scanned)

 

3. Manually type my notes into an Evernote note.

Manually Typed Book Notes (Evernote for Mac)

Manually Typed Book Notes (Evernote for Mac)

After reading Never Eat Alone by Keith Ferrazi, I began sending my reading notes to colleagues and people I’ve just met and would like to help. Because I save my notes in Evernote, I simply email the Evernote note with my reading annotations.

Emailed Annotations

Emailed Annotations

Sharing annotations is a great way to foster a culture of collaboration and growth– perfect for teachers and administrators.

 

 

Evernote Use #16- Use Web Clipper to Save & Share Articles #50EduEvernote

Over the next few weeks, I will be posting 50 different ways school administrators and educators can use Evernote to be more organized and more effective. I’ll be using #50EduEvernote on Twitter to further this discussion and share ideas. If you’d like, click here to follow me on Twitter.

Evernote Use #16- Use Web Clipper to Save and Share Articles  #50EduEvernote

Yesterday I shared how I use Evernote Clearly to read, annotate, and save online articles. I use Clearly often for reading, but when it comes to quickly saving and/or sharing an article, I use Evernote Web Clipper.

The two extensions have many of the same features, so you’re not going to go wrong choosing either. If you choose to download only one, the Web Clipper is the one you probably will use most often.

When you come across an article you’d like to save and/or share, it’s a great idea to clip it to Evernote so you’ll always have a copy (not just the link). You’ll notice in the article below, the ads and side links are all visible– making it look a little cluttered for saving. Simply clipping the Evernote Web Clipper extension solves the problem.

Online article (original site)

Online article (original site)

Once you click the extension, a side menu will appear.

Evernote Web Clipper (Evernote for Mac)

Evernote Web Clipper (Evernote for Mac)

Web Clipper gives you two options– share or save. The cool thing is, when you share the article, you can do both.

Save or Share w/ Evernote Web Clipper (Evernote for Mac)

Save or Share w/ Evernote Web Clipper (Evernote for Mac)

If you switch to the Evernote link, you’ll be able to share the note’s URL which will look like this:

Shared URL

Shared URL

Especially when sharing articles with students, it’s important for me to eliminate any distractions or inappropriate ads. Click here to view the entire shared Evernote note.

I use the Evernote Web Clipper every time I come across an article I’d like to save and/or share. I put the note in my “Articles” notebook and tag it accordingly (i.e., “leadership” or “creativity” or “Ed Tech”). I often share the articles with colleagues using the note’s URL or by emailing the specific note.

The Evernote Web Clipper is an essential web extension for your browser. Be sure to download it today!

If you’re new to Evernote or would like to convince a friend to give it a shot, they can sign up here and receive a free month of Evernote Premium.