Two Mac Tricks I Love (that you might not even know about)

I’ve been a Mac user since August, so these two tricks may be old news for some of you, but for me, they were game-changers.

1. Zoom-in while presenting

It seems that during any presentation, the speaker will say something like, “If you look at the top right of the screen,” and attempt to describe something in the presentation display. If only the presenter could zoom in on a slide during the presentation… But he can! Check it out:

 

2. Create audio files from text

By highlighting text and right-clicking, you can turn any text into an iTunes audio file. This is great for personal use (listening to blog posts, for example), and it’s also great to help students who might be struggling readers.

Turn an article, PDF, or blog post (like the one pictured below) into an audio file like this:

 

Blog Post

 

Watch the short tutorial below to learn how:

I’m loving having a Mac, and these are just two of my favorite newly-discovered Mac tricks. It seems like I discover something new every day (or at least every week).

What do you think? Have any tricks you’d like to share? Comment below.

 

Evernote Use #21- Saving and Annotating PDFs (mobile devices) #50EduEvernote

Over the next few weeks, I will be posting 50 different ways school administrators and educators can use Evernote to be more organized and more effective. I’ll be using #50EduEvernote on Twitter to further this discussion and share ideas. If you’d like, click here to follow me on Twitter.

Evernote Use #21- Saving and Annotating PDFs (mobile devices)

When I’m using my iPad or iPhone and find a PDF online, opening it in Evernote allows me to save and/or annotate the document. For example, when I attended the TICAL Conference today, I saved the conference program and used Evernote to help me navigate and mark which sessions I wanted to attend. Here’s how I did it:

Open In

 

The PDF will be saved to an Evernote note and you can use Evernote’s annotation tools to markup the document. For the TICAL program, I marked the concurrent sessions I wanted to attend and was able to reference them quickly.

Mark up

If I wanted to read more about the session, I would tap on any of the annotations to jump to the location in the PDF.

Full Mark Up

This system will work great for annotating any online PDF using your iPad, but it especially works great for conferences. The next time you attend a conference, download the program and give this a shot. More than likely you’ll use Evernote to take notes during the sessions anyway, so why not use Evernote to navigate the schedule?

Evernote Use #17- Save and Share Your Reading Annotations #50EduEvernote

Over the next few weeks, I will be posting 50 different ways school administrators and educators can use Evernote to be more organized and more effective. I’ll be using #50EduEvernote on Twitter to further this discussion and share ideas. If you’d like, click here to follow me on Twitter.

Evernote Use #17- Save and Share Your Reading Annotations

As an active reader, I highlight, write notes, and copy key ideas every time I read– whether it is my own physical book, a borrowed book, or an ebook.

When I finish a book, I save my reading notes to Evernote so that I have them everywhere I go. I often find myself thinking back to something I’ve read, and I love being able to access those notes from anywhere.

I typically save my reading notes one of three ways:

1. Import my notes and highlights directly from my Kindle account. (To learn the process I use, click here.)

Kindle Highlights and Notes (transferred directly from Amazon)

Kindle Highlights and Notes (transferred directly from Amazon)

 

2. Scan my handwritten notes.

Handwritten Book Notes (scanned)

Handwritten Book Notes (scanned)

 

3. Manually type my notes into an Evernote note.

Manually Typed Book Notes (Evernote for Mac)

Manually Typed Book Notes (Evernote for Mac)

After reading Never Eat Alone by Keith Ferrazi, I began sending my reading notes to colleagues and people I’ve just met and would like to help. Because I save my notes in Evernote, I simply email the Evernote note with my reading annotations.

Emailed Annotations

Emailed Annotations

Sharing annotations is a great way to foster a culture of collaboration and growth– perfect for teachers and administrators.