Managing Online Reading

To maximize online reading, I use several services to find great articles, to stay organized, to save articles for later reading, and to annotate while reading online. I’ll briefly explain the services I use below.

Zite– This is my new favorite! Zite allows users to create a personalized online magazine. After creating an account, users enter their interests and Zite combs the internet for blog posts and articles matching those interests. My Zite interests include blended learning, BYOD, classroom, classroom 2.0, Evernote, leadership, personal development, principal, teachers as technology trailblazers, and 12 other keywords. When I read an article, I can favorite it, share it, and I can also subscribe to other keywords.

Instapaper– Instapaper is how I save articles to read later. When I see a post on Twitter, Facebook, or anywhere else, I save it to Instapaper (using the toolbar extension). When I have time to read, I open Instapaper and have a list of posts I saved for later reading. I’ve used Instapaper for a while now and I love it!

Delicious– Delicious is new for me. It’s a lot like Instapaper but has some great social media functions built in. In addition to saving articles to read later, other users can subscribe to my Delicious channel and I can subscribe to other users. This is a great way to let others find the good stuff! Click here to check out my Delicious page.

IFTTT– If This, Then That is a pretty awesome service that finds resources for me and sends them my way based on a recipe I set up. For example, one of my recipes is “If I like a Twitter post, then send the post to my Delicious account.” So as I’m going through Twitter and come across something I really like, I’ll favorite it and the link is saved in Delicious. There are so many pre-made recipes on IFTTT that I just have gone through and picked the ones that might work for me. There are several that work with Evernote that are really helpful!

Clearly– I use the Evernote Clearly toolbar extension when I’m reading an article or blog post online because it clears out everything except for the text (no more ads, side links, flashing pop-ups, etc.) and it allows me to annotate directly on the article. Clearly links to my Evernote account, so when I highlight or make a note, the article and my annotations are automatically sent to my “Articles” notebook in Evernote. Click here to read more about how I use Evernote Clearly.

Lightly– This one is brand new for me, but I’ve already found it very beneficial when I’m reading on my iPhone or iPad. This app allows me to highlight key ideas while reading, and then the article is clipped (saved) directly to my “Articles” notebook in Evernote.

With so many articles and resources out there, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed, but these systems have really helped me manage my online reading. If you’re not already using a service similar to one of these, I suggest you give one of them a try.

If you are already using a service to manage your online reading, I’d love for you to post a suggestion below. I’m always looking for something new to try out.

Evernote Use #17- Save and Share Your Reading Annotations #50EduEvernote

Over the next few weeks, I will be posting 50 different ways school administrators and educators can use Evernote to be more organized and more effective. I’ll be using #50EduEvernote on Twitter to further this discussion and share ideas. If you’d like, click here to follow me on Twitter.

Evernote Use #17- Save and Share Your Reading Annotations

As an active reader, I highlight, write notes, and copy key ideas every time I read– whether it is my own physical book, a borrowed book, or an ebook.

When I finish a book, I save my reading notes to Evernote so that I have them everywhere I go. I often find myself thinking back to something I’ve read, and I love being able to access those notes from anywhere.

I typically save my reading notes one of three ways:

1. Import my notes and highlights directly from my Kindle account. (To learn the process I use, click here.)

Kindle Highlights and Notes (transferred directly from Amazon)

Kindle Highlights and Notes (transferred directly from Amazon)

 

2. Scan my handwritten notes.

Handwritten Book Notes (scanned)

Handwritten Book Notes (scanned)

 

3. Manually type my notes into an Evernote note.

Manually Typed Book Notes (Evernote for Mac)

Manually Typed Book Notes (Evernote for Mac)

After reading Never Eat Alone by Keith Ferrazi, I began sending my reading notes to colleagues and people I’ve just met and would like to help. Because I save my notes in Evernote, I simply email the Evernote note with my reading annotations.

Emailed Annotations

Emailed Annotations

Sharing annotations is a great way to foster a culture of collaboration and growth– perfect for teachers and administrators.

 

 

Evernote Use #16- Use Web Clipper to Save & Share Articles #50EduEvernote

Over the next few weeks, I will be posting 50 different ways school administrators and educators can use Evernote to be more organized and more effective. I’ll be using #50EduEvernote on Twitter to further this discussion and share ideas. If you’d like, click here to follow me on Twitter.

Evernote Use #16- Use Web Clipper to Save and Share Articles  #50EduEvernote

Yesterday I shared how I use Evernote Clearly to read, annotate, and save online articles. I use Clearly often for reading, but when it comes to quickly saving and/or sharing an article, I use Evernote Web Clipper.

The two extensions have many of the same features, so you’re not going to go wrong choosing either. If you choose to download only one, the Web Clipper is the one you probably will use most often.

When you come across an article you’d like to save and/or share, it’s a great idea to clip it to Evernote so you’ll always have a copy (not just the link). You’ll notice in the article below, the ads and side links are all visible– making it look a little cluttered for saving. Simply clipping the Evernote Web Clipper extension solves the problem.

Online article (original site)

Online article (original site)

Once you click the extension, a side menu will appear.

Evernote Web Clipper (Evernote for Mac)

Evernote Web Clipper (Evernote for Mac)

Web Clipper gives you two options– share or save. The cool thing is, when you share the article, you can do both.

Save or Share w/ Evernote Web Clipper (Evernote for Mac)

Save or Share w/ Evernote Web Clipper (Evernote for Mac)

If you switch to the Evernote link, you’ll be able to share the note’s URL which will look like this:

Shared URL

Shared URL

Especially when sharing articles with students, it’s important for me to eliminate any distractions or inappropriate ads. Click here to view the entire shared Evernote note.

I use the Evernote Web Clipper every time I come across an article I’d like to save and/or share. I put the note in my “Articles” notebook and tag it accordingly (i.e., “leadership” or “creativity” or “Ed Tech”). I often share the articles with colleagues using the note’s URL or by emailing the specific note.

The Evernote Web Clipper is an essential web extension for your browser. Be sure to download it today!

If you’re new to Evernote or would like to convince a friend to give it a shot, they can sign up here and receive a free month of Evernote Premium.