Evernote Use #28- Email Anything to Evernote #50EduEvernote

The next time you find something you want to save, an easy way to do it is to email it to your Evernote account. This could be a website, a picture, an article, an actual email that you forward– really, anything you’d like to save.

Each Evernote account has a unique Evernote email address that allows you to email notes directly to Evernote. (Note: This is different than the email address used to create the account). The address follows this pattern:

username.#########@m.evernote.com

Your unique email address can be found by clicking on “Tools” and “Account Info” or by clicking “Settings –> General  –>  Evernote Email Address” on your mobile device.

 

3 Email Tips:

1. Save your Evernote email address as a contact in your address book.  You’ll thank me later!

2. Email to a specific notebook. Emailed notes will go to your default notebook. However, you can email directly to a specific Evernote notebook by adding @+notebook name in the subject line (i.e. @School Ideas or @Personal).

3. Add tags to emails by using # in the subject line (i.e #PD or #Receipts).

Example:  Suppose you register for a conference and receive an email confirmation. It would be a great idea to save that to Evernote for quick reference, so you’ll want to email your “Registration Confirmation” to your “Professional Development” notebook and add a “2013-2014 PD” tag to it. Your email subject line may look like this:

Registration Confirmation @Professional Development #2013-2014 PD

Email to Evernote

Email to Evernote

Mailed-in Evernote Note

Mailed-in Evernote Note

Have another Evernote Email tip to share? If so, leave it in the comment section.

 

Evernote Use #27- Say goodbye to your flash drive #50EduEvernote

I have several Word and Excel files that I update regularly. I used to save the files in multiple locations– usually on my hard drive, on my school network drive, and undoubtedly on a flash drive. Because I would access one of the files from multiple locations, sometimes I wouldn’t update the most recently-changed document, so in essence, I had three or four versions of the same document floating around.

Using a flash drive helped me with this problem– as long as I didn’t lose my flash drive. But keeping up with a flash drive isn’t something I’m good at.

Maybe you can relate.

Today I don’t use flash drives, hard drives, or even my school’s network drive; now, I just use Evernote.

I save my Excel, PowerPoint, and Word files in a note, and when I need to update one of the documents, I open it the file, work on it, and when I save it, it saves it back to my Evernote note.

No more lost flash drives. No more having to drive to school at the night to search for something on my network drive. No more having a file saved on my laptop that I can’t access from school. It’s all on the cloud. Everything. Lesson plans, assignments, tests, projects, presentations, our budget– everything.

And not only that, but as a premium member, all of those files are searchable.

There are many great cloud-storage services out there. If you’re using one (even if it’s not Evernote), I’m sure you’re loving it. If you still save things on a flash drive or your hard drive, you may want to consider using Evernote.

Two Mac Tricks I Love (that you might not even know about)

I’ve been a Mac user since August, so these two tricks may be old news for some of you, but for me, they were game-changers.

1. Zoom-in while presenting

It seems that during any presentation, the speaker will say something like, “If you look at the top right of the screen,” and attempt to describe something in the presentation display. If only the presenter could zoom in on a slide during the presentation… But he can! Check it out:

 

2. Create audio files from text

By highlighting text and right-clicking, you can turn any text into an iTunes audio file. This is great for personal use (listening to blog posts, for example), and it’s also great to help students who might be struggling readers.

Turn an article, PDF, or blog post (like the one pictured below) into an audio file like this:

 

Blog Post

 

Watch the short tutorial below to learn how:

I’m loving having a Mac, and these are just two of my favorite newly-discovered Mac tricks. It seems like I discover something new every day (or at least every week).

What do you think? Have any tricks you’d like to share? Comment below.